Categories My Cousin Rachel Trailers & Spots Videos

New “My Cousin Rachel” Trailer

FOX SEARCHLIGHT – A dark romance, MY COUSIN RACHEL tells the story of a young Englishman who plots revenge against his mysterious, beautiful cousin, believing that she murdered his guardian. But his feelings become complicated as he finds himself falling under the beguiling spell of her charms.

A second trailer for My Cousin Rachel has now been released! Check it out below:

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Categories My Cousin Rachel Trailers & Spots Videos

First “My Cousin Rachel” Trailer

Fox Searchlight Pictures has today revealed the first international trailer and poster for My Cousin Rachel, a new film adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s acclaimed novel. Directed by Roger Michell and starring Rachel Weisz as Rachel and Sam Claflin as Philip, My Cousin Rachel will be released in cinemas on 9 June 2017.

A dark romance, My Cousin Rachel tells the story of a young Englishman who plots revenge against his mysterious, beautiful cousin, believing that she murdered his guardian. But his feelings become complicated as he finds himself falling under the beguiling spell of her charms.

Categories Their Finest Trailers & Spots Videos

First “Their Finest” Trailer

The first ever trailer for Sam’s new movie Their Finest is finally here, and it looks so great! Be sure to visit our partner site on Sam’s co-star Gemma Arterton – Gemma Arterton Online!

1940, London, the Blitz; with the country’s morale at stake, Catrin (Gemma Arterton), an untried screenwriter, and a makeshift cast and crew, work under fire to make a film to lift the nation’s flagging spirits; and inspire America to join the war. Partnered alongside fellow screenwriter, Buckley (Sam Claflin) and eccentric actor Ambrose Hilliard (Bill Nighy), the trio set off to make a film that will warm the hearts of the nation and capture the imagination of the American population.

Categories Film Festivals Interviews Their Finest Videos

(Video) “Their Finest” Cast Interview with Deadline

DEADLINE – Danish director Lone Scherfig continues her path to British citizenship with Their Finest, which took its world premiere bow at the Toronto Film Festival this past weekend. It’s her fourth British film in a row, after An Education, One Day and The Riot Club, and follows a group of characters in wartime London as they mount an heroic film production for the British government’s propaganda machine. When Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton) is seconded to pen a screenplay, she is immersed in an hilarious and warm theatrical world that includes characters like prima donna ham actor Ambrose Hilliard (Bill Nighy, on masterful form) and her handsome co-writer Tom Buckley (Sam Claflin).

Based on Lissa Evans’ novel and scripted by Gaby Chiappe, Scherfig’s film paints a rich and nuanced picture of life for those in London who weren’t off fighting, but who still made enormous contributions to the war effort as they dealt with nightly bombings during The Blitz. And it has something meaningful to say about the work of women, especially, in keeping the country running.

Its moviemaking backdrop was what attracted Scherfig, she told me, as she and her cast descended on the Deadline Toronto studio. “It’s a little window in film history where films have never been more important,” she noted.

Arterton shines in the lead, bringing truth and depth of emotion to the film as its parody of the world of 1940s film production keeps the tone light. “There’s broad strokes in this film,” she said, “but everything’s done with such detail that it makes it not-brash. That’s down to Lone’s attention to detail. Little tiny things that you might not even catch, really, but she sees and thinks about.”

Nighy gets the plummiest of plum parts as the monstrously egotistical Hilliard, and he was on typically riotous form at the Deadline studio. “They were looking for someone to play a chronically self-absorbed, pompous actor in his declining years, and they thought of me,” he quipped. “Which is tricky to process on occasion, but I suppose I should be just grateful for the work.”

The great skill of the film, though, is that even Hilliard’s arch character gets to demonstrate a softer side. Says Scherfig: “Ambrose Hilliard changes over the course of the film, as much as someone as vain and ignorant of what goes on around him can change.”